FAQs

FAQ

Q

What kinds of jobs are available for someone with an undergraduate degree in the Behavioral Sciences?

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A: Social services currently is one of the fastest growing fields in terms of employment opportunities and that fact is not likely to change any time soon. There are many opportunities for Behavioral Sciences students to become case workers, counselors in drug/substance abuse or group home settings, to work as therapeutic staff with those who have mental retardation, or behavioral problems, etc.. There are plenty of jobs for the Behavioral Sciences major in business areas, too: marketing, advertising, public relations, insurance, research and analysis. For a lot more ideas on careers in the Behavioral Sciences, visit Marky Lloyd's Careers in Psychology Page or the American Sociological Association's Student Career Page.

Q

If I already know the kind of job I want to get with my degree in Behavioral Sciences, shouldn't I be taking specialty courses to better prepare myself for that job?

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A: This is not necessarily a very good idea. Right now people in this country hold 5-8 different jobs in their lifetimes. Suppose I decide that what I really want to do in life is to build widgits, for example, so I go to school and I make sure that all the courses in my major have something to do with widgit building. When I graduate, all I'm going to know how to do is build widgits. I'm going to be in trouble if consumers stop buying widgits after a few years; or government subsidies for widgits are cut; or widgit building becomes computer automated; or I decide I can no longer tolerate the sight of widgits ("widgit burnout!"). That's what job (re)training programs are all about: people have to get retrained to do some other kind of job and then they start out at the entry level all over again. At Wilson we believe that Behavioral Sciences students are best served by learning the fundamentals: theory, methodological approaches, analytical, writing and critical thinking skills. These are the tools that will allow a student not only to gain an entry level position, but also to advance within her chosen career track fairly quickly. When the time comes to move on to another kind of job, or to graduate school, these same fundamentals will facilitate that transition. It's an approach that has served our students well. Check out the Career Paths of some of our recent graduates.

Q

I intend to go on to graduate school. What should I do to improve my chances of being accepted by a graduate school?

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A: Students often believe that graduate schools are looking for students who have had many courses as an undergraduate in some particular sub-specialty of Psychology or Sociology. Nothing could be further from the truth. Graduate schools want students who have demonstrated their ability to learn, understand, and apply the fundamentals. They want students who think critically, write well, speak confidently, work independently, can design and critique research, etc. Graduate school faculties typically want to be the ones to shape their graduate students in terms of specialty areas and theoretical approaches. Metaphorically speaking, they want high quality clay for that process. At Wilson we emphasize these all-important fundamentals and together with the distinct advantages of being very small and a college for women, our graduates have a most impressive record of acceptance into graduate programs. Check out graduate schools attended by recent Wilson graduates. Don't forget that Wilson College is ranked 2nd in the country among regional liberal arts institutions for the proportion of graduates who go on to obtain doctoral degrees.